11 Nagoya Sweets to Satisfy your Sweet Tooth

This post is for everyone with a sweet tooth!

If you love sweets and trying all the sweet things wherever, whenever, then this post is for you.

We are going to introduce you to the most famous and delicious local Nagoya sweets. Traditional Japanese sweets as well as modern creations. From cheap to expensive and in all shapes and sizes. Cookies, cakes, and little dumplings. 

Nagoya has a wide variety of dishes that will satisfy your sweet tooth for sure!

Uiro

Osu Uiro
Uiro display at Osu Uiro

Uiro is a traditional Japanese confection made by steaming a mixture of rice flour, water, and sugar and other flavors such as Yuzu, Matcha, Azuki, and Sakura into a rectangular shape. It is usually served with tea and has a very pleasant chewy texture and slightly sweet taste.

Nagoya is one of the biggest producers of Uiro, but it is not the only region in Japan where Uiro is famous. In Nagoya, Uiro has been produced since the Edo Period (1603 – 1868) but it gained nationwide recognition as a Nagoya specialty only in the middle of the 20th century. 

While there are many popular Uiro shops in Nagoya the following 3 might just be the most famous ones.

Aoyagi Sohonke founded in 1879 started producing Uiro in 1931. Their Uiro was the only kind of sweets sold on the Tokaido Shinkansen in 1964 which lead to its instant fame nationwide. They were also the first to sell Hitokuchi Uiro (bite-sized) Uiro which is more convenient than the big blocks you have to cut yourself before serving. The Hitokuchi Uiro comes as a set of between 5 and 25 pieces with the following 5 flavors: white sugar, brown sugar, green tea, red bean, and cherry blossom. A set of 5 costs 540 yen.

Aoyagi Sohonke (青柳総本家)
Opening Hours: 10:00 – 18:30; closed Wednesdays
Address: 2-18-50 Osu, Naka Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 460-0011
Website (Japanese only) | Google Maps

Osu Uiro was established in 1949 in the Osu district of Nagoya. They are famous for their Uiro and also something they call Nairo, Uiro mixed with Koshi-an red bean paste. Similar to Aoyagi Sohonke, Osu Uiro sells bite-sized sets of Uiro of between 5 and 25 pieces with the same 5 flavors. A set of 5 costs 540 yen.

Osu Uiro (大須ういろ)
Opening Hours: 9:30 – 19:00
Address: 2-18-42 Osu, Naka Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 460-0011
Website (Japanese only) | Google Maps

The oldest producer of Uiro in Nagoya is Mochibun Sohonten founded in 1659. This Japanese confection maker sells not only Uiro but also other sweets such as Dorayaki and Oni Manju. Their Uiro comes in 4 different flavors: white sugar, brown sugar, Matcha, and chestnut which they sell only by the block. One block of Uiro costs between 500 and 750 yen depending on the flavor.

Mochibun Sohonten (餅文總本店)
Opening Hours: 9:00 – 19:00
Address: 2-36-24 Yutaka, Minami Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 457-0863
Website (Japanese only) | Google Maps

All of the shops mentioned here sell their Uiro not only at their designated shops but also at department stores and souvenir shops all over the city. The most accessible place to find Uiro is probably at one of the Gift Kiosk at Nagoya Station.

Kaeru Manju

Milk Kaeru Manju
Kaeru Manju in a milk bath at Aoyagi Sohonke KITTE Nagoya

Aoyagi Sohonke also produces a second popular Nagoya sweet called a Kaeru Manju. A little frog-shaped confection filled with different seasonal flavors. The logo of Aoyagi Sohonke is a frog and that appears to be the origin of the frog-shaped sweet.

The Kaeru Manju with its cute expression and delicious seasonal fillings (Matcha, sweet potato, chocolate, and cherry blossom) is a popular souvenir. But you can also try one taking a milk bath at the Aoyagi Sohonke KITTE store next to Nagoya Station. A pack of 3 Kaeru Manju costs 324 yen.

Aoyagi Sohonke KITTE Nagoya (青柳総本家 KITTE名古屋店)
Opening Hours:
10:00 – 21:00; Sat + Sun 10:00 – 20:00
Address:
JP Tower Nagoya 1F, 1-1-1 Meieki, Nakamura Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 450-0002
Website
(Japanese only) | Google Maps

Nagoyan

Nagoyan
Nagoyan sweet cut in half

A Nagoyan, as the name might suggest is a popular local sweet, that has been a favorite of young and old for the past 60 years. Nagoyan is made from egg, honey, butter, sugar, and flour. And this round dumpling is filled with a yellow sweet bean paste. 

You can find Nagoyan everywhere in Nagoya, at supermarkets, convenience stores, department stores, and of course souvenir shops. The best way to enjoy a Nagoyan is with a glass of cold milk, coffee or hot tea. The gentle sweetness goes very well with both. A set of 8 Nagoyan costs 648 yen.

Oni Manju

Oni Manju Nagoya
Oni Manju on a serving plate

These little dumpling creations are a true local specialty. Oni Manju which translates to “Devil’s Rice Cake” is the favorite sweet snack of the locals. It is made from sugar, rice flour, and sweet potato chunks which give the confection its characteristic yellow color and uneven shape.

You can find Oni Manju everywhere. Not only at most traditional confectionery shops, but also at the supermarket, convenience store, and even as a festival food. Because of the sweet potato it is quite filling and makes for a great snack when you feel the sugar low in the afternoon. Depending on the shop an Oni Manju costs around 100 yen.

Oni Manju is one of the sweets you get to try on the Specialties of Nagoya Food Tour. Check here for more details.

Specialties of Nagoya food tour

Ogura Toast

Nagoya Morning
Nagoya Morning at Komeda’s with coffee and Ogura Toast

Nagoyan’s love their cup of coffee in the morning. And there is nothing better to accompany a hot cup of coffee than an Ogura Toast. An ultra-thick slice of golden toast spread with salted butter and topped with a generous amount of Ogura-an sweet red bean paste. It’s the typical breakfast item at all coffee shops in the city.

You can actually try Ogura Toast for free by visiting any Komeda’s Coffee until 11 in the morning where you will be served a free breakfast with any beverage you order.

This culture is called Nagoya Morning Service, and you can learn more about it here

Komeda’s Coffee (コメダ珈琲店)
Opening Hours:
 7:00 – 22:00
Morning Service:
 7:00 – 11:00
Address:
 Esca Underground Shopping Street, 6-9 Tsubakicho, Nakamura Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 453-0015
Website
 | Google Maps

Piyorin

Piyorin
Piyorin dessert new year’s edition

Almost too cute to eat is this chick shaped creation skillfully crafted at Cafe Gentiane at Nagoya Station. Piyori is a pudding filled sponge cake made from Nagoya Cochin Chicken eggs. This special breed of local poultry is said to not only have superior meat but also better quality eggs than your standard chicken. With a creamier texture and intensely color yellow yolk.

Piyorin is best eaten directly at Cafe Gentiane as the delicate dessert can only be safely transported for up to 3 hours. The cute chick-shaped cake comes in different flavors and with cute details according to seasonal events, holidays, and festivals, and it is always fun to see Piyorin changing throughout the year. A Piyorin costs around 500 yen depending on the edition.

Cafe Gentiane (カフェ ジャンシアーヌ)
Opening Hours:
 7:00 – 22:00
Address:
 1-1-4 Meieki, Nakamura Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 450-0002
Google Maps

Sasaragata

Sasaragata
Summer Sasaragata flavors

Sasaragata is a beautiful jelly-like bar combining traditional flavors such as Matcha, and red and white bean paste. Seasonal Sasaragata is also available, if you happen to be in Nagoya in summer don’t miss the beautiful lemon, watermelon, pineapple, or white peach Sasaragata.

The beautiful creations are produced by the long-established Ryoguchiya Korekiyo. It was founded in 1634 to serve as the official confection maker of the Owari Feudal Domain. 

Sasaragata is a real Nagoya treat and a popular souvenir which you can buy at one of the many Ryoguchiya shops or at souvenir shops at Nagoya Station, at the airport, or at department stores throughout the city. A set of 5 Sasaragata costs 1404 yen.

To enjoy Sasaragata serve with Japanese hot or cold tea and coffee.

Ryoguchiya Korekiyo (両口屋是清)
Opening Hours:
 9:00 – 18:00; closed Thursdays
Address:
 4-4 Higashiyamatori, Chikusa Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0807
Website
 (Japanese only) | Google Maps

Tabimakura

Tabimakura
Tabimakura on a serving plate

Another creation of Ryoguchiya Korekiyo is the popular Tabimakura confection. A simple baked creation made by wrapping sweet red bean paste in a wafer sprinkled with black sesame seeds. The name and shape of the confection come from a kind of vase.

You can buy Tabimakura on their own or in a set with similar baked confections at any Ryoguchiya shop or at department stores and souvenir shops throughout Nagoya. A set of 8 Tabimakura costs 507 yen.

Ryoguchiya Korekiyo (両口屋是清)
Opening Hours:
 9:00 – 18:00; closed Thursdays
Address:
 4-4 Higashiyamatori, Chikusa Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0807
Website
 (Japanese only) | Google Maps

Fruit Daifuku

Fruit Daifuku
Fruit Daifuku display at Benzaiten

Fruit Daifuku itself might not be a local specialty but the growing popularity of Benzaiten, the shop that produces this sweet, calls for a mention on this list.

As the name suggests, Fruit Daifuku is Daifuku filled with fruit. A Daifuku, which translates to Great Luck, is a red bean paste filled Mochi made from rice flour. The Fruit Daifuku at Benzaiten are filled with only the most expensive and exclusive fruit such as white strawberry, green or purple grapes, white Momo, and the sweetest Mikan. A single Daifuku can cost between 350 and 950 yen which makes this a very exclusive gift for a special occasion rather than an everyday treat.

Kakuozan Fruit Daifuku Benzaiten (覚王山フルーツ大福 弁才天)
Opening Hours:
 10:00 – 19:00
Address:
 5-2-4 Nisshintori, Chikusa Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0844
Website
 (Japanese only) | Google Maps

Agemanbo

Ageman
Agemanbo at Nayabashi Manju Bansho-an

The word Agemanbo could be roughly translated as deep-fried rice cake on a stick. And that’s exactly what it is. At Nayabashi Manju Bansho-an in Osu district, they tried to create street food inspired by their specialty, a traditional Japanese Manju filled with red bean paste. So they put it on a stick, coated it with some batter, and deep-fried it in oil. And the result is so delicious it is almost unbelievable no one else is doing it. 

The Agemanbo is best fresh out of the fryer when it’s still hot and gives off a scent not unlike a deep-fried donut. The Anko red bean filling is soft and creamy and harmonizes perfectly with the crispy coating. One Agemanbo costs 200 yen.

Nayabashi Manju Bansho-an (納屋橋まんじゅう万松庵)
Opening Hours:
 10:00 – 19:00
Address:
 3-27-24 Osu, Naka Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 460-0011
Website
 (Japanese only) | Google Maps

Agemanbo is one of the street foods you get to try if you participate in a Street Food Tour of Osu. Book your tour today!

Street Food Walking Tour of Osu

Shiro Noir

Shiro Noir
Matcha Shiro Noir at Komeda’s Coffee

A Shiro Noir is a creation you can find at Komeda’s Coffee, one of the most popular coffee chains originating in Nagoya. Shiro is Japanese and means white, Noir comes from the French word for black. We are not sure what the name has to do with the sweet as it isn’t like the name might suggest black and white.

A round danish is topped with a generous serving of milk soft-serve ice cream and accompanied by a serving of delicious sweet syrup. The dish is simple but so delicious. Komeda’s has many limited edition Shiro Noir versions throughout the year so it is always fun to try the seasonal flavors which could be chocolate, melon, strawberry, Matcha, red bean, pudding, or sweet potato. Shiro Noir comes in 2 different sizes, normal and mini. The mini version costs 550 yen, the normal size 750 yen.

Komeda’s Coffee (コメダ珈琲店)
Opening Hours:
 7:00 – 22:00
Address:
 Esca Underground Shopping Street, 6-9 Tsubakicho, Nakamura Ward, Nagoya, Aichi 453-0015
Website
 | Google Maps


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Lena Yamaguchi
About the author

In love with Japan and its amazing food, Lena wants to share her passion with the world. Her goal is to make everyone interested in Nagoya, her adoptive home, online through her writing and offline through unique food tours.

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